I Should Not Have an Education: or, Why I’m Moving to Rwanda

What would you think if I didn’t apply to grad school, I texted my mother, and instead moved to Africa to teach English?

I got her answer almost immediately: Can I call you?

To be fair, she handled the whole situation better than a lot of parents might have, and over the next several hours, I laid out my reasoning behind discarding applications to a handful of top-notch universities and banking on a long-shot application to the Peace Corps.

My main reason: I should not have an education.

Education is an interesting thing, when you sit down to think about it. For centuries, only the wealthy or religious were educated, and the working classes were kept in their place largely by a lack of education. In some times and places, it simply wasn’t available. In others, it was illegal—consider the way white Southerners kept black slaves under control by limiting their education. Today, we consider education a necessity, but millions of children worldwide either can’t go to school or have to drop out before finishing.

Analfabetismo2013unesco

According to UNESCO, 61 million primary school-age children were not enrolled in school in 2010. Of these children, 47% were never expected to enter school, 26% attended school but left, and the remaining 27% are expected to attend school in the future.
(DoSomething.org)

I say that I should not have had an education, and maybe that sounds odd. After all, I’m a white American living above the poverty line. I learned to read and write before kindergarten and maintained high grades from beginning to end of my education, and I never once questioned whether I would go to college (though, as I later learned, my parents did).

But the truth is, I would not have had that education if it were left up to me; I’m only in my position because a lot of people made a lot of sacrifices. I succeeded in high school because my mother devoted time and energy to homeschool six children when the public school system failed us. My parents managed a tight budget to buy me books on my birthdays. I attended a fantastic college mostly on scholarships and work-study, and I studied abroad thanks to generous gifts from family and friends.

“In developing, low-income countries, every additional year of education can increase a person’s future income by an average of 10%.”
(DoSomething.org)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/overseas-development-institute/2577909266/in/photolist-4VNsBu-8HVPCM-5SVQV1-nDu143-fzviyT-9W1vid-9SCSqn-a6EB2f-7VmTTi-ptXje-5yn99M-omJjSi-aiCeyy-8ntqHo-9LQWFw-4eVLyf-6ccQXV-fPTHeV-4eRN4n-miR75-4eVLxs-5rkbrw-4eRN3v-5G4HBz-9Xh8kF-9v2KdX-9v5KgN-efdcc9-9SFKsW-2UXZzH-zc9oU-C4aBt-ai57Xe-9SCSEg-88FiwB-9SFKGS-9SFKm9-9SCSwV-9SCSPR-9SCSMP-9SCSBF-9SCSGF-9SCSz8-9SFKqA-zYJWH-3q8BFc-7yXa4L-9rju35-9Kztfc-cXp2NS

Don’t get me wrong—I worked hard for my education—but I started from a position of privilege, and it was the sacrifices and gifts of other people that put me there. And suddenly, a year ago, wading through grad school applications, I stopped and asked myself, “Why?”

Why go to grad school? Why spend that much more money—someone else’s money, of course—to spend another two years revelling in a writing-centred world of my own? Why go on to a career, to make money to pay for a flat so I could live in a city with a job where I could make money to pay for a flat to…? That day, staring at the bright pictures of classrooms and successful grad students, I thought, What a waste.

Not that education is a waste of money. I think education is one of the most valuable things we have—the chance to broaden our worlds, learn new skills, open up opportunities. But taking an education I’d been essentially given and using it merely to make myself a lucrative life? It sounded thoroughly selfish.

“53% of the world’s out-of-school children are girls and 2/3 of the illiterate people in the world are women.”
(DoSomething.org)

Literature cracked the world open for me. It gave me a place to hide, new thoughts to think, unexpected people to love. It taught me to understand and communicate with diverse groups of people, to consider every perspective, to grieve for every pain. Practically, communication skills make me more likely to get and keep a good job. Literacy gives me the chance to learn outside a formal educational structure, and writing gives me an effective self-therapy option when anxiety strikes.

And, faced with the option to spend two more years either enjoying my education or sharing it, I couldn’t fathom choosing the former.

This leads me to my official announcement: in September, I fly to Kigali, Rwanda to spend the next two years teaching high school English.

I’m thrilled. I’m terrified. I’d love to answer your questions, and I hope you’ll stick around and let me virtually take you with me on this journey.

rwanda-697792_1280


*This is a scary announcement because the Peace Corps gives volunteers no guarantee that they won’t be cut from the programme before arrival. My status as a volunteer could change between now and September, although obviously I don’t anticipate that happening.

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14 thoughts on “I Should Not Have an Education: or, Why I’m Moving to Rwanda

  1. I did a 6 week summer placement in Africa when i was at uni. Life-changing! Can’t even imagine what 2 years will be like. Go for it though. You won’t regret it 🙂

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  2. Hey new grad here trying to make the decision to stay or go. Right now I’m debt free but having a terrible time finding jobs, so thoughts? Spend more time and money at school (and begin going into debt) or (idk.my other options lol) hammer away at the job hunt I guess?

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    1. That’s a pretty big decision! First of all, congrats on graduating, because that’s a big deal and I know how much work must’ve gone into it. Second, it probably depends on your situation and what you want from your future. Depending on your field of study, you might find a grad school that offers assistanceships, letting you ‘pay’ for your tuition by working on campus and teaching some classes. If you’re not into pushing further into higher ed, there are a lot of options but also, of course, a lot of uncertainties. You might be able to find some freelance work (I’ve been working on Upwork.com and found it a great place for picking up a paycheck though not super consistent), or you could look into internships—they might be easier to get accepted into and might have a chance of getting you hired in the end. The Peace Corps is a great option financially (shameless plug!) but certainly not the route if you’re looking for something easy or comfortable, and it’s not a fast process. In short, I’d recommend looking into as many options as possible at the same time—I’m a fan of the shotgun approach. Shoot for everything and you’ll hit something, right? Whatever you end up doing, good luck! I hope something works out for you soon.

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